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A Different Kind of Easter Egg Hunt

A few years ago we switched up our style of Easter Egg Hunt. Instead of filling the eggs with candy, I filled them with tokens that the kids could redeem for prizes. This worked so well, it’s become a family tradition.

A Different Kind of Easter Egg Hunt | Life as MOM

I have some great memories of Easter Egg hunts!

Once my siblings and I were mostly grown up, my mom started hiding money in the Easter eggs instead of candy.

Mom’s really good about giving money away. She loves to be generous that way, only she would always worry if an egg wasn’t found. Some random stranger or dog was going to get the 20 bucks that she had intended for her progeny.

One year, Mom bought white eggs and hid them inside my home that we were remodeling. They were so hard to find because they blended into the unpainted drywall. She even wrapped one in aluminum foil and hid it near exposed duct work. She is a sly one, my mom.

At least that time, the cash wasn’t going to go to the random stranger. It would just languish above the window trim for a few months until I found it.

I haven’t quite matched up to her prowess, but I’m getting there. Last Easter I started a different kind of egg hunt.

A Different Kind of Easter Egg Hunt | Life as MOM

As you will remember, a couple years ago about this time, our family did a sugar fast. It was a really good experience for all of us to realize how much processed sugar is hidden in so many foods.

While I still keep granulated sugar in my cupboards today, I’m more mindful of how many sweets we’re having.

A Different Kind of Easter Egg Hunt

For our hunt I splurged on See’s candy. After the sugar fast I wanted good candy if I was going to get candy at all. Instead of filling the eggs and risking melted See’s candy, I made little paper tokens to fill the eggs. Then the kids could redeem their egg money for candy.

They loved it! Better yet, they asked that I repeat the tradition. Again and again.

I’m happy to reduce our sugar intake wherever possible, so instead of lots of candy, I buy prizes that the kids will want to redeem their tokens for. I’m sharing this now instead of later so that if this sounds like a good fit for your family, you can do it, too.

(Be sure to grab the printable below to make it easy.)

This post does include affiliate links. If you make a purchase from one of these Amazon links, I am paid a small amount in advertising fees. Your price is not changed, but your purchase helps keep this site available to provide free content to you and all your friends. Thanks for your support.

A Different Kind of Easter Egg Hunt | Life as MOM

Easter Egg Hunt Tokens

Step one. Make some tokens.

So, here are the tokens, or yolkens as we might say. Simply print off as many sheets as you like, cut the yolks apart, and fill your plastic eggs.

GET THE PRINTABLE

Step two. Go out and get some prizes.

I got a variety of items that I might have bought the kids this spring/summer anyway so that I’m not buying a ton of junk to pick up later. (Remember the Christmas stocking ordeal?)

A Different Kind of Easter Egg Hunt | Life as MOM

Easter Egg Prizes

A Different Kind of Easter Egg Hunt | Life as MOM

A Different Kind of Easter Egg Hunt | Life as MOM

Don’t feel like you have to get special prizes if you don’t wanna. My littles are super excited about this year’s Easter Store, but they were equally thrilled with redeeming their tokens for candy last year. However, in this way, you don’t have to worry about getting all the eggs.

What’s YOUR Easter Egg Hunt tradition?

I’d love to hear what fun thing your family does at Easter so that we can work it into our family’s traditions. See ya in the comments!

This post does include affiliate links. If you make a purchase from one of these Amazon links, I am paid a small amount in advertising fees. Your price is not changed, but your purchase helps keep this site available to provide free content to you and all your friends. Thanks for your support.

More Easter Fun:

*Originally published March 26, 2015.

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Comments

  1. Last year my daughter was four and needed help with my new tradition. This year I think she will be able to do it on her own. In each egg I put a word. The words mad up a sentence. Ex: To find your prize go to the big white shed.
    In the hiding spot was a kite. This year it will be 2 sentences since she is older and two prizes. One sentence will be in pink eggs and another sentence will be in blue eggs.

  2. Stephanie S says:

    Thanks for this wonderful idea. Our extended family gets together for dinner and an egg hunt. There are 11 grandkids that range in ages from 12 to 1 so it gets challenging to find age appropriate things that can fit in an egg. This way everyone can get what they want and anything left over can be saved for next year.

  3. Janet Suleski says:

    i do two types of egg hunts with my girls. The first one, I put pictures in each egg. The picture shows where the next egg is. Each egg leads to the next egg. With the second one, I write a clue as to where the next egg is. So the girls have to think in order to get all their eggs. Other years, I have just hidden themed eggs and said go find xx number of eggs. My girls have loved finding the eggs each year. I have also hidden their baskets.

  4. Oh my gosh!!! I live this idea and will totally be doing this THIS year! Thank you for sharing

  5. This year each of our eggs will contain a puzzle piece to a custom puzzle. When they have all the pieces, they can assemble the puzzle to reveal a clue to where their Easter baskets are hidden.

  6. Our Easter hunt is a little bit different and unusual. Since there are 6 grandchildren that go from 7 months to 4 years they get the egg hunt but for toy eggs. My siblings and I are over with egg hunts so my parents one year decided to hide the small bottles of alcohol around the house (we loved this idea) and there were no babies yet in the family. It is a great idea for parents who have older kids who have outgrown egg hunts.

  7. This is a fantastic idea!! We managed Halloween with a pinata filled with individual bags for kids, but I have been trying to figure out how to navigate Easter. Thank you!!!!

  8. love it, I will defiantly have to do this. this year. thank you for the idea.

  9. We haven’t had one tradition for Easter egg hunts. It’s varied based on where we are at the time. I have done something similar to what you mentioned. I put one of two types of papers in each egg. Each paper could be redeemed for one candy treat or one egg. We had about 10 kids doing it, and they all enjoyed it. 🙂

  10. I put goodies in the easter basket, this wouldn’t work for me. 🙁

  11. We did Easter egg hunts at my mother’s for years, my 2 cousins, my sister and I would buy the candy, and I had a big basket of eggs we re-used every year. Since the age difference was quite vast and who wants to have one person have 30 eggs and someone else 3?? (and the ensuing tears!) We would count how many eggs once filled, divide by # of children, determining how many eggs per child. That way if the big teenagers got their’s faster they would then help the littles find the rest and was a fun game for all. One year the kids stole the basket of eggs off to a bedroom, lowered it out the bedroom window and hid the eggs and made us adults go chase around! Also the kids would go find something at Grandma’s to use as a bucket, not traditional baskets, the funnier the better for photos. I think the funniest was my 6 foot + nephew running around the yard with a fishing net and a dozen or so eggs, fun memories now! Then it was always the tradition for all the kids to crowd onto Grandma’s porch for an annual photo and after the photo we would ALL have a silly string fight, children and adults. Such fun to look back on!

  12. I like this idea so much I’m adapting it to our annual neighborhood Easter egg hunt. Not only does it make it easier to buy items since they don’t have to be small enough to fit inside eggs , but we can get prizes of various values that appeal to different ages, genders and interests.
    In addition, since we are Christians and love the Scriptures that talk about new life, we are adding Bible verses to the back of our tokens, so, like fortune cookies, each person can find inspirational messages inside his or her eggs.
    Our egg hunt has become a tradition among our neighbors so that they all ask me about it and look forward to it each year. Thanks for posting your ideas!

  13. Sherrie Roderick says:

    We did this and my children kept saying “this is the best egg hunt ever. They loved choosing and “buying” their own stuff. I am going to hit the clearance and fill my box up for next year! Thank you so much for the idea!

  14. Mary Wong says:

    We tried this on Easter Sunday and boy was it successful! We had friends over for Easter dinner and between all of us we had 6 kids from age 3 to 9. They loved shopping and they chose the prizes over any candy. I knew we also had very competitive kids and I wanted it to be fair for everyone. I chose 6 different colors and each kid got to draw a color for them to hunt for. Instead of being competitive it was collaborative. I heard things “Hey who has orange, there is an orange one here!” Once they found all their eggs they needed to help others find theirs. I also had one egg that said you get to pick first for prizes. We agreed that from there it would be youngest to oldest. I thought I would get some gripe from the oldest. But the oldest said “that is okay, I am older so I understand.” All in all, it was a huge success. The kids all liked it and can’t wait until next year. Thanks for the idea!!! 🙂

  15. I would put candy in the eggs and hide them in the yard. t was a lot of fun until we had a late Easter and 80 degree temps….ant colored eggs. Yum. So I go smart and started putting change that I had saved up over the year. I would also put dollar bills in some. Usually a couple of $1 and maybe a $5 or a $10. I would also have a “golden” egg that contained $25 in it. That went over real well until a neighbor child came over and joined in and found the “golden”egg. Good thing she was one of my “other” children. So now I do the egg hunt but save the “golden” egg for my children. Mine now range in age from 14 to 23. And yes they still expect an Easter basket with our traditional trimmings such as bubbles and balls and paddles.

  16. Growing up we didn’t get candy as my mom didn’t let us have much sugar. She would instead hide presents all over the yard (usually 3-5 each). That made Easter feel a little more like Christmas! Love your idea for my five kids as we are also trying to cut back on sugar, but the token idea may inspire my three teens to also join in with the easter egg hunt. I’m so on the same page with you about the See’s candy. If we are going to have candy, I want the good stuff! 🙂

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